The Vaper`s Guide to PG Allergies

May 15, 2017 3 min read 1 Comment

The Vaper`s Guide to PG Allergies

The Vaper`s Guide to PG Allergies: Diagnosis and Solution

Welcome to the vaper's guide to PG allergies. Propylene Glycol or PG is one of the two key ingredients for e-liquids that are used by many vapers in pens and box mods (the other one being vegetable glycerin or VG). While generally being the more popular ingredient it has the unfortunate drawback of more people being allergic to it and responding poorly. While negative responses to PG generally aren’t deadly it’s best to identify them and look for alternatives. Here we’ll show you how to tell if you’re allergic to PG and what to do about it.



PG allergies can actually be hard to detect due to fairly weak symptoms however its best to indentify if you experience any of the following.

PG Allergies: Sore Throat

If after vaping with PG you experience dry or itchy throat this may be you. Around 1 in 100 people have this reaction to PG bases again this is a fairly minor symptom but can prove to be problematic and annoying for those who vape frequently as well as a catalyst for much more potent problems (disease or infection). Try vaping with and without PG or going to the doctor to see if this applies to you.

PG Allergies: Itching or dryness in skin

If you find your skin to be dryer or itchier than usual after vaping with PG this might be you. Around 1 in every 5000 people have this much stronger reaction to PG. While not deadly this can be extremely annoying in day to day life and you’ll likely benefit from any alternative options. Again the best way to check is to go periods smoking with and without PG or again going to your doctor.

PG Allergies: Ears Ringing

If you are getting headaches and hear a loud ringing in your ear after vaping with PG this might be you. Around 1 in every 100,000 people experience this worsening in tinnitus (ringing in ears) when using PG. This is one of the more major symptoms and isn’t very well understood so you’re best off looking for alternatives or seeing a doctor if you really want to know more about this.

Alternatives to PG

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is one of the available alternatives to PG. It is much rarer than its counterpart but its gaining traction in the community as its actually presents flavours better than both PG and VG this makes it a good alternative for those both sensitive and not sensitive to PG.

Vegetable glycerine (VG) as mentioned earlier is the second base ingredient for e-liquid. While it and PG are usually mixed together in varying concentrations pure VG e-liquids are fairly common and actually a lot cheaper than PG. This however comes with the drawback of higher viscosity which makes the substance gooier and leaker. This can become a problem if you don’t maintenance and clean your vape frequently. So make sure to keep your vape clean should you switch to this alternative.

Another option is to stop using e-liquid. “Flowers” or dried herb flavourings can be used in many pens and to avoid negative reactions to PG it may be worth it for you to consider switching your flavouring type.

There are generally more types of flavourings that don’t use PG and it may be in your interest to look around and find the one which is right for you. However always be careful as one advantage you’ll be leaving behind with PG is a lot of research proving it’s safe. If you’re concerned about your health do make sure to check your materials and consult a doctor if you want to see what you’re allergic to.

Vaping ingredients can be very interesting and risky. Being a new technology a lot of the ingredients in e-liquids and ingredients for vaping in general lack research. This makes choosing ingredients hard for the health conscious consumer. This makes it both interesting and dangerous to mix and mash ingredients as we don’t know what’s in them and we put them through our lungs. As time passes and more ingredients are produced, discovered and/or deemed safe or dangerous we can have a better understanding of vaping on the human body, but in the mean time watch your ingredients, watch how your body reacts enjoy a hit and stay safe.


1 Response

Valeria Cuenca
Valeria Cuenca

May 24, 2017

Propylene glycol, also called propane-1,2-diol, is a synthetic organic compound with the chemical formula C3H8O2. It is a viscous colorless liquid which is nearly odorless but possesses a faintly sweet taste. Chemically it is classed as a diol and is miscible with a broad range of solvents, including water, acetone, and chloroform.

It is produced on a large scale and is primarily used in the production of polymers, but also sees use in food processing, and as a process fluid in low temperature heat exchange applications. In the European Union, it has the E-number E1520 for food applications.

If you read this blog you can see that it listed the effects of PG if you’re allergic to it. If you shows some of this signs you must stop using it and find alternative.

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